So you think you know CSS and html and javascript?

Discussion in 'Off Topic' started by jensen, Apr 20, 2015.

  1. jensen

    jensen Active Member

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  2. Sharky

    Sharky Community Paragon Community Support

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    Oh dear, I only got 56% for HTML. But I did answer the 'thumbnails in a grid' question with using a table.
     
  3. jensen

    jensen Active Member

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    Strange coincidence. I got 56% for CSS.
    They make me go back to read up again on what CSS actually does.
    Good test with problems to solve.
     
  4. essellar

    essellar Community Advocate Community Support

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    The biggest problem with the CSS test is that a lot of it relies on terminology (taxonomy, really - "which of the following is/is not an X?") rather than on the meat of CSS and what it does (specificity, cascades/inheritance, how to write effective selectors so you don't have to encode your presentation in your markup, that sort of thing). I mean, it's not like you have to order the things out of a catalogue with no pictures; knowing whether your required widget is called a whatsit or a doohickey is only ever helpful when you're writing a test like that.* But yes, CSS is big, especially when you need to take vendor-specific stuff into account. I've found, though, that if you structure your page properly/sanely, you can get an awful lot done with a small subset of the beast that is CSS (and a single small CSS file as well).

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    * I'm not sure whether or not there's much of the same in the HTML test; I've been working with HTML since '93 and used SGML for years before HTML was invented, so I may have the taxonomy stuff built in so deep now that I don't notice it anymore. (The HTML test was an easy ace for me because I've only had to learn the new stuff along the way. The whole language was tiny - it didn't even have tables yet - when I started. So when something like srcset and sizes come along, it's only the changes to the img tag attributes that need to be crammed into my tiny brain.)
     
  5. jensen

    jensen Active Member

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  6. bitblogp

    bitblogp New Member

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    I got a 76% on the CSS, tho to be honest I'm not really a designer.... I'm more of a developer who knows a bit about designing stuff. Major things I think with CSS is that there are many, many ways of doing a lot of things. You have to find a style of CSS that works well with the way you want to build your layouts. If it works well and is fast for the end user then really you're doing it right.. It may look dirty, but hey you're not going to break anything with some dirty css.... Well usually.
     
  7. essellar

    essellar Community Advocate Community Support

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    The real teat is whether or not you're injecting markup to accomplish your styling tasks. If your page (and I'll assume web page here, as opposed to an application that happens to live in the browser) still makes a certain basic sense with CSS and image loading disabled, there's a pretty good chance that you're more-or-less headed in the right direction. That, of course, means that your headings still have the hierarchy that their visuals with CSS turned on imply, that emphasis is still there, that things like acronyms and definitions still work, navigation still makes sense (even if it's kinda ugly, people should still be able to find and use it), tables are still tables -- and they're the only things that look like tables -- and so forth. If you need CSS or JavaScript, or even a special font, to make your page make sense, you're doing it wrong. If you can't skin your page -- change it around utterly -- without touching the markup, you're doing it wrong. You can add functionality. You can override defaults. But your page should work for your users pretty much regardless.

    Of course, when you're talking about apps -- real freakin' applications, not just a web page that has a form with an AJAX submit-and-update -- then the rules are a bit different. If you can find a way to make a rockin' game that works with static image-free HTML pages without JS or CSS, my hat is off to you, along with any hats I may own in the future.
     
  8. ChatIndia

    ChatIndia Community Advocate Community Support

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    Since I only code for my own projects I feel comfortable as long as I know what I need to google.
     

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