suggestion Java IDE (Linux)

rolandr

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I took a course in Java. We were using TextPad (I think) compile it in Blue Bird. [ Don't lauqh ].

I did have have Borland's J++ but it was Window 2000 (or Win 98 )

I'm looking at all these Linux Java IDE. Anyone have a suggestion which is fairly easy on the learning curve?

If no one answer, then I'm going have to use the VI editor and compile my Java programs at the command line.
 
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misson

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VI, while a powerful editor, is not an IDE, and doesn't offer everything an IDE offers. If an IDE is truly what you desire, don't settle for an editor (not that there's anything wrong with developing with an editor).

I mostly use Eclipse but wouldn't recommend it; no-one would describe it as "easy to learn". I'm not certain which IDEs are the easiest to learn, but try out NetBeans and IntelliJ Community Edition and see which you like. If you don't like those, a web search will turn up many more. Perhaps someone with more experience with these IDEs will chime in.
 

johndass

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Yes, as [mission] suggested, Netbeans is easy to install and use. Ideal IDE for beginner. Eclipse is for more experienced programmers, IMHO.
 

rolandr

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Thanks, mission, johndass. I was kidding about using the vi editor. ( lol ) Please note, I have an object oriented programming courses both C++ and Java under my belt so its not like I'm learning a new programming language. But I learned these using the vi editor then compiling it at the command line [ old school ].

It just that the Borland's J++ (Window environment) had too many bells and whistle that I would like. I need something simple before I get something more productive advance IDEs as I go up the learning curve. Kind of like learning Paint => Paint Shop => Adobe PhotoShop (yes these are Window base).

Thanks, I'll try Netbeans.
 

garikr

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Why not to use "gedit" or other simple editor with code highlighting....
 

jcscherer82

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Well,

Right now we are using in my college course NetBeans. It is quite a nice IDE but there are a few areas that it really does fail at.

1. The way it formats code is not that great. I have been having a tough time trying to get it to style the code the way I want it.

2. Whenever you use import for certain libraries, it will highlight it incorrectly. Just ignore it when it does this.

3. Be careful with it because sometimes it will tell you that the code has changed and will revert it back to the beginning of the coding process. Just watch out for this because it really sucks when all of your code goes away after hours of work.

4. Back up back up back up. This is the one thing that I had to learn. Once you delete a file, it does not go to the trash bin, it goes away forever. This happened to me when I was trying to finish a project before midnight and I accidentally deleted the entire project.

Overall NetBeans is a nice IDE but there are a few things that you need to watch out for.

Justin
 

essellar

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3. Be careful with it because sometimes it will tell you that the code has changed and will revert it back to the beginning of the coding process. Just watch out for this because it really sucks when all of your code goes away after hours of work.

4. Back up back up back up. This is the one thing that I had to learn. Once you delete a file, it does not go to the trash bin, it goes away forever. This happened to me when I was trying to finish a project before midnight and I accidentally deleted the entire project.

Those are two very real bummers. There is no reason that they should happen to you. Netbeans has built-in hooks to several different version control systems, including SVN, git and Mercurial. The only excuse for not using version control is not knowing about it, even as a solo developer. That working-class class you enhanced until it set the Java Virtual Machine on virtual fire? It's still there! You can revert. Need to create two or more very similar applications for different clients? Fork it. Need to work with another developer? Replicate your repository to a network location so you can both check out files and commit changes.

As for Eclipse, well, it does everything -- if you know where to find it. It's big. It's also a huge resource hog, so you need a pretty substantial hardware stack to make it go. Linux may run just fine on an old 486SX-16, but Eclipse wants (and needs) your 2+ GHz multi-core processor and at least a couple of gigs of RAM to get out of neutral (it will run on less, but it'll feel just like an old VT-100 connected to an oversubscribed mini as you wait for your keystrokes to be echoed on screen). And while it's easy enough to hammer out simple code with few dependencies without opening a lot of books and stuff, the learning curve for anything approaching sophisticated use of the tool is pretty steep. Not emacs steep, but steep nonetheless.
 

kreator12

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Use NetBeans it's installable with aptitude
or you can use Eclipse, it's open source too
 

chanh.ong25

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The latest Netbean 6.9.1 is really nice so does the Eclipse. But if you just want to have a basic editor emacs or scite (Linux and Windows) and notepad++ (Windows only)
 

descalzo

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Eclipse is the basis for Adobe's Flex Builder and other tools are built on top of it too.
Or there is an excellent plug in (like for Google's Android platform).
 
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