Can "Me" work as Subject of a sentence?

anhminh

Member
Messages
110
Reaction score
0
Points
16
Me is a pronoun. I wonder if It can stand at the beginning of a sentence.
Can anyone give me an useful advice?
In this case, should I use "Me" or "I"?
Perhaps me, you can hang out together, if you guys dont mind.

Thanks in forward.
 

leafypiggy

Manager of Pens and Office Supplies
Staff member
Messages
3,819
Reaction score
163
Points
63
It's not grammatically correct, but you *can* do it...

Like: Me thinks ... Etc

It's normally used as slang in IM or texting or stuff like that.

However, Prefixing a sentence with "Me" works fine, as it does in French and other languages.

Me, I think ... Etc
 

anhminh

Member
Messages
110
Reaction score
0
Points
16
According to your signature, you are anti-republician.
So can you give me your explaination, why do you "anti" it? Somehow I can be your follower after a meet?
Thanks anyway.
 
Last edited:

Sharky

Community Paragon
Community Support
Messages
4,397
Reaction score
91
Points
48
You've got a fan there, leafypiggy!!! Someone who'll be hanging out and following you all the way home...
 

leafypiggy

Manager of Pens and Office Supplies
Staff member
Messages
3,819
Reaction score
163
Points
63
Actually, It's a list of things, not a list of things I'm against. I'm sorry you took it that way, sir.
 

charlie91

New Member
Messages
8
Reaction score
0
Points
0
The way I understand the slogan, he's only anti-Obama, and he's Republican (not anti), etc...

"Perhaps me, you can hang out..." -- I think this is correct, but there is a pause after 'me'; might be better to say: "Perhaps we can hang out..."

"Me, I think..." -- it's okay. So it depends on the context, but they may not qualify as complete sentences.
 

leafypiggy

Manager of Pens and Office Supplies
Staff member
Messages
3,819
Reaction score
163
Points
63
It's really a direct object or indirect object pronoun, so in reality, it can't be used as a subject (unless as I said, in slang).

Your sentence, Charlie, would be "Perhaps you and I could hang out..." I'm fairly certain that it can't be legit. used as the subject of a sentence.
 

leafypiggy

Manager of Pens and Office Supplies
Staff member
Messages
3,819
Reaction score
163
Points
63
The word is methinks ...


I'm completely aware. No need to point it out. I was simply saying that "Me thinks" is how people speak online sometimes. For example, /me thinks that descalzo is spamming.

It's third person singular, in case you were wondering.
 

Sharky

Community Paragon
Community Support
Messages
4,397
Reaction score
91
Points
48
/me is a command so doesn't apply.

Sorry

What about: "Me love u long time"?
 

shandy7894

New Member
Messages
9
Reaction score
0
Points
0
Actually, It's a list of things, not a list of things I'm against. I'm sorry you took it that way.
__________________________________
digital agency

---------- Post added at 06:12 AM ---------- Previous post was at 06:10 AM ----------

According to your signature, you are anti-republican.So can you give me your explanation, why do you "anti" it? Somehow I can be your follower after a meet?Thanks anyway.
_______________________________________

digital agency

---------- Post added at 06:20 AM ---------- Previous post was at 06:12 AM ----------

It's really a direct object or indirect object pronoun, so in reality, it can't be used as a subject (unless as I said, in slang).
__________________________
digital agency
 

vv.bbcc19

Community Advocate
Community Support
Messages
1,524
Reaction score
92
Points
48
Me is a pronoun. I wonder if It can stand at the beginning of a sentence.
Can anyone give me an useful advice?
In this case, should I use "Me" or "I"?
Perhaps me, you can hang out together, if you guys dont mind.

Thanks in forward.

"Me" can be used at the starting of a sentence like I did in this sentence.
But If you want to make pronoun "me" a subject,its wrong grammatically as it is an object when its born.
These days many people have Me as their names/surnames.So googling gives you certain sentences which start with me but they are not in your case.
 

ChatIndia

Community Advocate
Community Support
Messages
1,408
Reaction score
30
Points
48
Actually, It's a list of things, not a list of things I'm against. I'm sorry you took it that way.
__________________________________
digital agency

---------- Post added at 06:12 AM ---------- Previous post was at 06:10 AM ----------

According to your signature, you are anti-republican.So can you give me your explanation, why do you "anti" it? Somehow I can be your follower after a meet?Thanks anyway.
_______________________________________

digital agency

---------- Post added at 06:20 AM ---------- Previous post was at 06:12 AM ----------

It's really a direct object or indirect object pronoun, so in reality, it can't be used as a subject (unless as I said, in slang).
__________________________
digital agency

thanks. i learned a lot. :p
 

essellar

Community Advocate
Community Support
Messages
3,295
Reaction score
227
Points
63
Irish (and Newfoundland) English is a bit of a special case -- it's a language that uses primarily English words, but the grammatical rules are at least heavily influenced by Gaelic. You'll see that mostly in colloquial usage (not slang, but the everyday language of ordinary people). You can see that in a lot of places. "I have just done that," for instance, is more likely to be rendered as, "I'm after doing that." SImilarly, the "s" marker tends not to indicate the third person singular, present tense (Standard English), but the primary verb in a sentence: "I doesn't like it when he do that."

"Methinks" (always one word, by the way) is archaic, and was probably the last holdover from Gaelic in what was to become Standard English (the courtly London-area dialect) other than "do support". Common constructions -- the things we use a lot -- hold on longer than they ought to as the world around them changes. It's the same reason why we still have plurals like men, women and children (words we use often, along with a lot of Germanic farming plurals) when the simple "s/es" plural marker took over everywhere else. ("Do support"? We use the word "do" as a part of the construction of verbs in a way that no other language except Gaelic does. There are only two other very small regional dialects, one of Italian and one Caucasian, that use a similar construction, and then only in the interrogative.)

That leaves only the case of the compound subject. "Billy and me went to the store." We're all taught in school that it's wrong, but there is good evidence to suggest that it is, in fact, correct. "Me went to the store" has always been wrong in Standard English, and the two (and there were only two of them) pedantic old cranks who almost simultaneously decided to apply Latinate grammar rules to English (to make it a respectable, world-class language) in the seventeenth century decided that the compound needed to change as well. Where did they go wrong?

The compound "Billy and me" is an expansion of "we". "We", in a self-respecting Indo-European language, has always expanded to the object form. That is, the answer to "who are we" has always been "we are you, him and me". These two idiots decided that it needed to be "we are you, he and I". In most Indo-European languages, you would say "it's me", not "it is I". No French speaker would ever say "c'est je"; the correct form is "c'est moi". But then French already had the juice; they didn't need to put on respectable airs for company.

Unfortunately, three hundred years of blackboard grammar has most of us convinced that "Billy and me went to the store" is wrong, and to the majority of educated people, it does sound wrong -- even if it is the form that best fits our internal grammar (the ordering of branching in the semantic trees is remarkably consistent in any natural language that isn't in the process of changing word orders, and English is a "hard" SVO language). So, in day-to-day conversation, don't worry about it, but in written communication, it's probably best to go with the flow, so to speak, just in order to maintain the veneer of academic respectability.

But outside of Ireland, Newfoundland and (perhaps) parts of Australia, one ought not use an isolated "me" as the subject of a sentence.

"/me" is a variable -- in the elder world of chats, BBSs and dungeons, it was replaced with your handle (user name). At first, seeing it naked online meant the user had forgotten where he/she was at the time, then it became a badge of leetness. Now it's a joke of sorts, used to describe what your imaginary avatar would be doing at this point in an online conversation.

/me takes a sip of coffee, sparks another smoke and laughs quietly to himself at the thought.

Note that all of the verbs in that statement are in the third person. That's correct usage for the "/me" construct.
 
Top