Verified By Visa

mattura

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Has anyone ever come across difficulties with this service?

I set it all up and found that every time I used it, the transaction was rejected. Many phone calls and much frustration later, I discovered that the reason was that my 'billing address' had been marked as 'gone away' (which apparently happens whenever any post to you gets returned). I can't imagine why some post was returned, but the answer is to go to a branch and 'verify' your address. Unbelievable!

The worst part was, the bank doesn't tell you what the problem is (as I discovered the first time I called), you have to kind of guess, hinting at what might be the problem before they will actually investigate. I had no clue, so I went through it all ("how about the billing address, could that be wrong?"...) before I got an "Oh yes you have a gone away marker!".

Well hopefully I'll be able to buy things online now...
 

zen-r

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I have avoided signing up for VbV, because it's another pathetic gimmick by banks to look like they've added a layer of security, when in fact it is actually a very bad system for a number of reasons.

It's also used by the banks to shift liability away from themselves when transactions go wrong, thus covering their own backs. It does not benefit the consumer.

These news stories which I read last year explain things, including why VbV even encourages us to leave ourselves open to phishing fraud ;

http://www.theregister.co.uk/2008/10/23/vbyv_analysis/

Here's why it adds no new security, because it's a doodle to just reset the password ;

http://www.theregister.co.uk/2008/10/23/vbyv_password_reset/
 

Hoobrum

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verified by visa - do you opt for that or is that something they just give?
 

zen-r

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Merchants have been pressured into using VbV by the credit card companies.

If you try to buy from one of those merchants, you can't unless you use VbV. If you haven't already signed up for it, you then have to, or you can't proceed with the purchase.
 

ichwar

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Merchants have been pressured into using VbV by the credit card companies.

If you try to buy from one of those merchants, you can't unless you use VbV. If you haven't already signed up for it, you then have to, or you can't proceed with the purchase.
Which merchants are these? I have yet to come across one of these. Have you?
 

mattura

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If you have signed up for it, can you tell which these merchants are?

I found one site I could buy things from without using vbv, but the other sites I have used all used vbv. For example the most annoying ones are the rail companies - I couldn't get any (cheap) advance tickets for train travel...
 

ichwar

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Oh, ok, so wer're talking travel companies. Does amazon do this?
 

azntechguy

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I quite agree that Verified by Visa and Mastercard SecureCode is simply bothersome (yet another PIN to remember) and a not-so-subtle attempt at shifting liabilities to the consumer (Well, whoever used the card knew the PIN, so it must've been you or someone you gave permission to. And no, our systems can never be compromised and data stolen even when the customer did his/her utmost best in maintaining card security.).

The implementations of both systems are ineffective. Very few merchants participate and simply very little means to determine if it is a phishing attempt. Very few financial institutions bother to promote the program anyway (e.g.: Washington Mutual, before it was "bought" by JPMorgan Chase under somewhat questionable circumstances, did offer the option for their debit cards, but buried the signup link deep in their website)

I've read about the program and ultimately decided against signing up.

verified by visa - do you opt for that or is that something they just give?

It depends on your locale and the merchants that you do business with.

In the United States, in most cases, it's strictly optional and voluntary.

Merchants have been pressured into using VbV by the credit card companies.

If you try to buy from one of those merchants, you can't unless you use VbV. If you haven't already signed up for it, you then have to, or you can't proceed with the purchase.

Perhaps that might be the case with the majority of online retailers in the UK (I'm making an assumption based on your sig. content), but in the United States, it's strictly optional and voluntary.

Those who registered are presented with that "PIN Pop-up." Those who didn't will simply have their cards run as a card-not-present transaction.

I should add that Chip and PIN hasn't been implemented across the United States and personally, I hope they don't (I have serious misgivings about the PIN system after reading up on one too many security breaches). I've only seen a handful of stores having a POS terminal with Chip and PIN reader here in New York (and those are mostly stores that serves a fair volume of international clients)
 

mattura

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Unlike VBV, Chip and PIN seems like a good idea though... It means that if you steal a card, instead of simply having to forge a signature, you have to know the PIN. I know many shops didn't use to even look at the signature of the customer, and if they did, not many shop assistant are handwriting experts..., so this must be a step in the right direction.
 

Livewire

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Unlike VBV, Chip and PIN seems like a good idea though... It means that if you steal a card, instead of simply having to forge a signature, you have to know the PIN. I know many shops didn't use to even look at the signature of the customer, and if they did, not many shop assistant are handwriting experts..., so this must be a step in the right direction.

Signature checking needs to be required.

I signed one as Shamu yesterday, never even a sideways glance from the cashier.



Seriously. I just said I'm Shamu, the famous whale. Should be obvious he can't write - he has no thumbs :)
 

mattura

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Signature checking needs to be required.

I signed one as Shamu yesterday, never even a sideways glance from the cashier.



Seriously. I just said I'm Shamu, the famous whale. Should be obvious he can't write - he has no thumbs :)

Yeah my mate signed as "Mickey Mouse", and it was looked at, but obviously the assistant didn't read the signature as it wasn't picked up!
 

Sharky

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Unlike VBV, Chip and PIN seems like a good idea though... It means that if you steal a card, instead of simply having to forge a signature, you have to know the PIN. I know many shops didn't use to even look at the signature of the customer, and if they did, not many shop assistant are handwriting experts..., so this must be a step in the right direction.

Chances are, if someone's gonna clone a card at a cashpoint/mobile payment device/etc, they'll have a mini-camera hidden somewhere to watch the PIN entry. Or just watch you enter the number. Which is bad, because instead of having to try to forge a signature, all they have to do is remember FOUR digits. Chip & PIN is a lame half-baked solution to a problem that still exists. In fact, it's worse, especially for the elderly, who commonly have the PIN number written on a scrap of paper, folded around the card!
 

mattura

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I still think it's an improvement on signature checking though. Most people are savvy enough to know when they are being shoulder-surfed or to at least cover the number panel with their other hand when entering the pin.
 

zen-r

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Chances are, if someone's gonna clone a card at a cashpoint/mobile payment device/etc, they'll have a mini-camera hidden somewhere to watch the PIN entry. Or just watch you enter the number. Which is bad, because instead of having to try to forge a signature, all they have to do is remember FOUR digits. Chip & PIN is a lame half-baked solution to a problem that still exists. In fact, it's worse, especially for the elderly, who commonly have the PIN number written on a scrap of paper, folded around the card!

I still think it's an improvement on signature checking though. Most people are savvy enough to know when they are being shoulder-surfed or to at least cover the number panel with their other hand when entering the pin.

And you can change your PIN (number) whenever you want. It's not so easy changing your signature!

Chip & PIN is in theory fairly secure. However, the implementation has been bad, & for various reasons it still leaves the user just as unprotected from fraud as ever.

This article covers it quite well, though is a bit out of date now ;

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-389084/Millions-danger-chip-pin-fraudsters.html

Also, machines in shops & supermarkets have been tampered with ;

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/new...as-netted-millions-from-British-shoppers.html
 
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Sharky

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If anything, chip and PIN can be considered LESS secure... A craftily cloned card reader could be used in place of the real thing by someone posing as a restaurant employee that not only duplicates the card details ,but also receives the unwitting customers PIN number. Yes, I've watched The Real Hustle on TV. Yes, Jessica-Jane Clement is rather nice. :p
 

azntechguy

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If anything, chip and PIN can be considered LESS secure... A craftily cloned card reader could be used in place of the real thing by someone posing as a restaurant employee that not only duplicates the card details ,but also receives the unwitting customers PIN number. Yes, I've watched The Real Hustle on TV. Yes, Jessica-Jane Clement is rather nice. :p

Agreed.

I view it more as an opportunity for a financial institutions to wiggle out in cases of fraud, leaving the victim holding the bag than an initiative to safeguard security on the consumer's end.
 

zen-r

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If anything, chip and PIN can be considered LESS secure... A craftily cloned card reader could be used in place of the real thing by someone posing as a restaurant employee that not only duplicates the card details ,but also receives the unwitting customers PIN number. Yes, I've watched The Real Hustle on TV. Yes, Jessica-Jane Clement is rather nice. :p

But the point is, that a fake card reader can only copy the magnetic stripe, NOT the CHIP. Thus, the cloned card wouldn't actually be usable later if all machines made sure that the CHIP was present. Unfortunately, as I referred to earlier, the implementation of CHIP & PIN is bad, & many machines which can't find or read the CHIP from a card, just default to reading the magnetic stripe instead - thus defeating the whole point of having the CHIP on the card!

Re. The Real Hustle : I don't know why J-J C evens bothers to carry out these elaborate scams on guys. She could just ask them to give her all their cash, & most (drooling) guys would willingly oblige! ;)

Agreed.

I view it more as an opportunity for a financial institutions to wiggle out in cases of fraud, leaving the victim holding the bag than an initiative to safeguard security on the consumer's end.

Yes, you've hit the nail on the head.
 

kkenny

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Signature checking needs to be required.

I signed one as Shamu yesterday, never even a sideways glance from the cashier.



Seriously. I just said I'm Shamu, the famous whale. Should be obvious he can't write - he has no thumbs :)

Aha. I never check the receipts, I just ask for ID and as long as they look like the person, it's fine. Only one time when there was this guy who had long hair in his id picture, but he had a buzzcut so I checked his actual signature to the back of the card. But most cashiers don't care anymore.
 

jtwhite

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Aha. I never check the receipts, I just ask for ID and as long as they look like the person, it's fine. Only one time when there was this guy who had long hair in his id picture, but he had a buzzcut so I checked his actual signature to the back of the card. But most cashiers don't care anymore.

Everywhere I go they just swipe the card, don't look at the back, don't ask for ID. The best safeguard would be to keep up with your card and be sure the site you're purchasing from is secure.
 
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